Java Performance Tuning

Java(TM) - see bottom of page

|home |services |training |newsletter |tuning tips |tool reports |articles |resources |about us |site map |contact us |

Our valued sponsors who help make this site possible
AppDynamics: Get complete browser to backend visibility. Monitor Now! 

New Relic: Try free w/ production profiling and get a free shirt! 

ManageEngine's Site24x7: End-to-End analysis on Java EE web transactions. Sign up for FREE! 

News August 2013

JProfiler
Get rid of your performance problems and memory leaks!

Chart Java Jitter with jHiccup
Monitor and identify pauses in your Java apps. Download now

Why is my application so slow?
Learn 3 ways to detect Java Application Performance Trends


Java Performance Training Courses
COURSES AVAILABLE NOW. We can provide training courses to handle all your Java performance needs

See Your Message Here
You could have your tool advertised here, to be seen by thousands of potential customers

Java Performance Tuning, 2nd ed
The classic and most comprehensive book on tuning Java

Java Performance Tuning Newsletter
Your source of Java performance news. Subscribe now!
Enter email:


AppDynamics
AppDynamics: Get complete browser to backend visibility. Monitor Now!

New Relic
New Relic: Try free w/ production profiling and get a free shirt!

ManageEngine
ManageEngine's Site24x7: End-to-End analysis on Java EE web transactions. Sign up for FREE!


JProfiler
Get rid of your performance problems and memory leaks!

Chart Java Jitter with jHiccup
Monitor and identify pauses in your Java apps. Download now

Why is my application so slow?
Learn 3 ways to detect Java Application Performance Trends


Back to newsletter 153 contents

Load on the server is NOT a measure of user performance. For example, if a user's session gets killed or frozen, that reduces the load on the server. But for sure performance has not improved for that user. To take this to extreme, if all the user sessions freeze or die (or any combination of those two), load on the server looks magnificently low, but performance has gone to pot. Yet I continue to find operations groups who use load on the server as a proxy for what they think must be user experience. "Are you sure there's a problem? we can't see any load on the server." is the typical response. "Please try again".

A note from this newsletter's sponsor

ManageEngine: Application Performance Management for Java EE Apps.
Monitor App Servers: JBoss, WebSphere, WebLogic, JVMs and JMX Apps.
*** Monitor up to 25 App Servers, Databases & Servers at $795/Yr***.

Trying again is even a reasonable suggestion, many problems are from a glitch in a session somewhere which caused the session to freeze or die. The 'IT Crowd' running joke "have you turned it off and on again" is a reasonable suggestion to many glitches. In a browser most people will refresh the page when it hasn't appeared after about four seconds; or click a button again if they see no response from clicking it the first time. But if "try again" works, that doesn't mean you've solved the issue, it means you've just worked around it. Most operations are happy to leave it there, and most users are equally happy, after all it's working now and that's mainly what matters. But there's a glitch somewhere, and glitches tend to come back when you least want them, especially under load when it can make things even worse on your system (hanging connections from abandoned sessions that have been restarted has caused more than one server to run out of resources).

All of this means you need to measure user performance from the user side. That way you can see when user performance is bad; and you can detect any widespread glitches that users are working around with restarts, which can come back to bite you when you don't have the capacity to handle lots of user restarts. And that user performance measurement and reporting needs to be built in to your application, not simulated or inferred. If you aren't measuring user performance from the user perspective, you are missing the most important metric in your system.

Now on to all our usual links to Java performance tools, news, articles and, as ever, all the extracted tips from all of this month's referenced articles.

A note from this newsletter's sponsor

New Relic - Try New Relic today and get your free Data Nerd shirt!
Free SaaS APM tool to monitor, troubleshoot, and tune apps
running on Websphere, Weblogic, Tomcat, Jetty, JBoss, Solr, Resin

News

Java performance tuning related news.

Tools

Java performance tuning related tools.

A note from this newsletter's sponsor

Get total visibility in just 15 minutes with AppDynamics Lite,
A performance monitoring tool for Java/.NET apps.
It installs in minutes and it's free forever. Download AppDynamics Lite today.

Articles

Jack Shirazi


Back to newsletter 153 contents


Last Updated: 2014-09-04
Copyright © 2000-2014 Fasterj.com. All Rights Reserved.
All trademarks and registered trademarks appearing on JavaPerformanceTuning.com are the property of their respective owners.
Java is a trademark or registered trademark of Oracle Corporation in the United States and other countries. JavaPerformanceTuning.com is not connected to Oracle Corporation and is not sponsored by Oracle Corporation.
URL: http://www.JavaPerformanceTuning.com/news/news153.shtml
RSS Feed: http://www.JavaPerformanceTuning.com/newsletters.rss
Trouble with this page? Please contact us